Exempt vs. Non-Exempt Employee Classification

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt Employee Classification

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt Employee Classification

Most business owners find it difficult to distinguish between the exempt and non-exempt employees, and it also causes a great deal of confusion between employers and employees. Whether you are entitled to the overtime payment or not (usually means the extra time you work after the standard 40 hours for every week), depending on your exemption position according to the FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act), remains the primary ambiguity in this regard. However, various other jobs don’t fall under these standards, like agricultural jobs, truck driving, and others, which are usually governed by other law organizations.

Majority of citizens in U.S come under the FLSA and you can either classify them as exempt or non-exempt, depending on the overtime pay regulations. As an amateur, you may not have a clear idea of what category of workers these are, but don’t ponder over it because that’s what we are here for today! We’ll give you a quick breakdown of what rules apply to which workers. So let’s dive right in.

Non-Exempt Employees

If you work as a non-exempt employee for more than the standard time per week, that’s 40 hours, then according to the FLSA policies, you are entitled to extra pay for the time and one-half of the standard hours of overtime work you spend. Concisely, if you are working on the hourly basis and get paid for the hours you work, apart from the standard hourly paid rate, then you are classified as a non-exempt employee. If you are a non-exempt employee, then you will not qualify for the numerous white collar job exemptions. Such employees usually include maintenance, technicians, construction, semi-skilled, blue collar, laborers, and clericals.

Exempt Employees

Such employees don’t get any protection and cover from the FLSA, and this means that they are not entitled to any overtime payments. According to the FLSA, airline and sales employees are exempt, and if you meet with three points, then you are in this category. These are the rules that apply:

  • If you are getting a payment of $23,600 for the year
  • If you get paid on the wage basis (doesn’t apply to people who work on “hourly basis,” like school teachers, and physicians)
  • If you perform duties on the job that are classified as exempt

To qualify for the exempt status, the nature of your job is also taken into account. Typically, the duties of exempt employees are high, and the FLSA splits them into three further categories:

Executive

Employees are exempt from the FLSA policies and rules if they perform duties such as:

  • Supervise more than one employee
  • Work as a manager
  • Having the power to hire, assign tasks, fire and so on.

In most cases, such people are usually considered in charge or the boss of the business or company.

Administrator

For people who have duties that support the business, like public relations, accounting, human resources and payroll staffs, then they fall under this category. Duties must also include:

  • Office work
  • Tasks related to the management or customers of the business
  • Independent discretion and judgment of significant business matters

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What Records to Keep in a Personnel File?

What Records to Keep in a Personnel File?

It can be difficult to know what employee records a small business should keep in a personnel file. Should it only hold onto the bare minimum and risk not having enough documentation to protect itself should it need to in the future, or should it keep everything and files become so thick that it is impossible to find anything efficiently? Ultimately, a practical compromise is necessary.

Below is a brief list of the essential documents a small business should keep in a personnel file. However, please remember that this list is a guideline, a template and that ultimately it is up to the specific needs of the small business to determine what stays and what goes.

 Employment Agreement Records

The most basic of personnel file documents that need retaining should center on the professional relationship between the employee and employer. These documents would include the employee’s application and resume, the description of the job as given to the employee, the offer of employment, and the signed receipt of the employee handbook.

 Legal Documents

The most important of the legal documents that need retaining should be the ones related to taxes. These would include W-4s and state withholding forms. Obviously, the tax forms required by your business may not be the same as other businesses, but the idea is to make sure that a copy of whatever tax forms is required always are kept in the employee’s file. Also, legal documents may include next of kin information, emergency contacts, and forms relating to employee benefits.

 Employee Performance Documents

An essential collection of documents is how the employee performs their job. Primarily, this documentation will provide the necessary empirical data to justify an employee’s review. A short list of such records would include awards, reprimands, notes on attendance, certificates of successful completion of training programs, and why and under what conditions the employee left. In essence, these documents should give a stranger an understanding of what this individual was like as an employee.

Unnecessary Documents

However, there are records that you should avoid including in an employee’s personnel file. These would include an I-9 as a government official who may need access to this record does not need to leaf through all the other personal information to find it, and medical records as a small business are legally required to keep this information confidential and available to only a select few.

Government Policies

Government Policies

Most small business owners are well informed about what government policies apply to them, specifically what FLSA (Fair Labor Standards Act) policies they need to be in accordance with according to their business. However, an increasing number of small businesses have been cited for policy violations. It makes one wonder if small businesses are as informed as they think they are about some of the more common FLSA policies. Below is a list of some of the more egregious violations.

Unpaid Compensable Time

A good example is unpaid compensated time; this is when an employee works through lunch but is not paid for that time. That is if the lunch is unpaid, but the employee engages in work that benefits the company they can be entitled to appropriate compensation. Granted, there is some gray area to this policy, but it is one that is in need of handling through communication with the employee and the proper authorities instead of hoping that no one notices.

Unpaid Vacation Time

Unpaid vacation time occurs in mainly one instance: when an employee leaves (whether through being fired or quitting) they are entitled to their paid vacation time. Though the FLSA does not require paid vacation, if the company offers it then it is considered part of the employee’s compensation for their work, just like their wage or salary. If the employee is no longer working for the company, they are entitled to these earnings.

Overtime Status

The FLSA guarantees overtime pay to non-exempt employees. Conversely, they do not guarantee it to exempt employees. The rub is the classification. Now, there are numerous criteria to determine which classification an employee falls into, but it is up to the small business owner to make sure that they are correctly designating the people that work for their company. This can be a major violation if the government finds the owned to be non-compliant.

Overtime Pay

Likewise, if the calculation of overtime pay is determined to be faulty, it can be a major FLSA violation. The FLSA states that any non-exempt employee working over 40 hours in a workweek is to be paid one and half times their wage. Of course, there can be a miscalculation as to when exactly an individuals work week begins or ends, which is to say that if a small business has non-exempt employees, it needs to double check that it is paying the overtime as per FLSA regulations.

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What Is a Vendor Credit, and How Do You Record One?

What Is a Vendor Credit, and How Do You Record One?

Whether you’re getting a vendor credit for a refund or a return, you can record it in QuickBooks Online.

When you’re dealing with your company’s vendors, you’re probably accustomed to money flowing in one direction: theirs. Maybe you send them to purchase orders and they send you invoices. Or they send you bills and you pay them. Or you walk into a store and buy something your business needs.

Sometimes, though, vendors owe you money. Probably the most common scenario is a return of merchandise, products that you’ve sent back to the supplier for any of a variety of reasons. You may be issued a credit of some kind simply because you’ve been a loyal customer, and a vendor wants to reward you. You might also get a rebate for an item you bought.

In these cases, you’ll enter a Vendor Credit in QuickBooks Online, which you can apply the next time you buy something from that supplier. Usually, the process is pretty straightforward, but sometimes situations arise that may make it hard for you to know how to record a vendor credit accurately. We can help if this happens.

Simple Steps

Let’s start with a simple example. Let’s say you received a shipment of pens that you’d planned to use as promotional items for your salespeople. The ink on some of the pens had gotten smudged, so your company email address printed on them was illegible. The supplier issued you a credit of $50.00 for future purchases and sent you a reference number to use.

It’s easy to complete a Vendor Credit form in QuickBooks Online for a simple credit. But other situations are more complicated.

Here’s how it would work. Click the + (plus) sign in the upper right corner of the screen and select Vendors | Vendor Credit. A screen like the partial one pictured above would appear. These are the fields you would need to complete:

Vendor – Click the down arrow in the field in the upper left corner and select the correct vendor, or + Add New.

Payment date – Change the default date if it’s not correct.

Ref no. – Enter a reference number if applicable.

Under Account details, click in the field under Account, and open the drop-down list by clicking the down arrow on the right. Select the account you used when you created the original expense. Enter a Description and the Amount of the credit.

You can add a Memo in the box at the bottom of the screen if you’d like, and select any Attachments to include from your file directories. Otherwise, click Save and close or Save and new.

Additional Input

There’s much more to the Vendor Credit screen that you didn’t need to consider for this example. The row where you entered Account, Description, and Amount contains several additional fields that you may need to complete in some cases. They are Billable, Markup %, Tax, Customer, and Class. If you’re not sure when these fields are required, ask us to go over these concepts with you.

There’s also another section under Account Details you may need to address: Item Details (click the arrow to open if necessary). You would only enter information here if you’re returning items to a vendor. Fields displayed there include Product/Service, Qty (quantity), Rate, and Sales Amt (amount). We don’t recommend that you do this the first time on your own; let us help.

Using Your Credit

How do you redeem this credit? QuickBooks Online reminds you to use it.

QuickBooks Online records your Vendor Credits and reminds you that they’re there when you go to pay that vendor again.

The next time you enter a transaction that involves—or will involve—sending that vendor some money, you’ll see a record of that credit to the right of the Check or Expense screen, for example. In the image above, a small box has opened as soon as the vendor’s name was selected. You can Add that credit to the current transaction or Open it if you want to see the original screen.

Not everyone uses Vendor Credits. Some businesses find workarounds. But we recommend you at least understand when and how they’re used so your bookkeeping is accurate and precise. We’d be happy to spend some time with you going over your financial relationship with vendors, and how QuickBooks Online helps you document it.

 


Looking for a QuickBooks Expert?

QuickBooks ProAdvisor Houston TxWorking with a QuickBooks ProAdvisor is the best way to learn how to use QuickBooks to help your business grow and flourish. You won’t find a better way to get the support you need anywhere else.

As a small business owner, we realize that you may not have the budget to hire a QuickBooks expert. If you’re looking for a more economical way to get set up on QuickBooks, we provide cloud bookkeeping programs to match any business requirement. Here are our Quickbooks ServicesQuickBooks Setup, QuickBooks Training, and Quickbooks Review.

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If you would like to learn about all the benefits that STAC offers, just give us a call and we’ll provide you all the details. Call us at (844) 424-9637.

Decision-Ready Financial Reporting for Your Salon

Decision-Ready Financial Reporting for Your Salon

Decision-Ready Financial Reporting for Your Salon or Spa

Financial reporting is a crucial element for any business as it helps in making decisions. Reports such as Profit and Loss, Balance Sheet, and Cash Flow Statements are helpful with the growth analysis of small businesses, but they are typically prepared monthly.  So let’s look into how this helps with making intelligent business decisions this month?

When your virtual bookkeeper sends your business customized, decision-ready, financial reports for your Salon & Spa at your fingertips it can help your business become more profitable.  Here are five areas where STAC Bizness Solutions can assist with your business growth:

1. Providing Gross Margin Analysis

Gross margin is an indicator of a company’s financial health. It will tell you how much profit the company is earning before operating expenses.  Here is a question to ask yourself.  Are your margins lower than the industry average? Here at STAC Bizness Solutions, we have extensive knowledge in the salon and spa industry and can provide gross margin insights.

2. Establishing Key Performance Indicators

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measures how effectively a business is reaching their targets. Successful salons and spas set their goals within a given period and monitor them each week.

Would you like to increase your new clients or increase the number of retail product sales? Our services provide you with customized reports for salons and spa to track the KPIs required for your business.  Ask one of our team members to show you the benefits of having your small business managed by STAC Bizness Solutions.  We would be happy to give you a free consultation.

3. Delivering Industry Benchmarks

Industry benchmarks help in assessing your Salon and Spa business performance by comparing it with your competition. These industry benchmarks help with identifying the gaps in your business and give you valuable insights about where you are successful or where you can make an improvement.  Your STAC Bizness consultant will assist in helping you get these reports to make the best decision for your Salon or Spa business.

4. Preparing a Twelve-Month Forecast

A 12-month forecast is integral for any business to thrive. It is a prediction of future developments such as sale, expenses, and profits. The twelve-month forecast that we will prepare for your Salon and Spa business will assist with making goal-oriented decisions.

5. Providing Management Reports

Management reports give you a deeper understanding of your success. We will identify the data that your business needs and our management reports will help make predictions about the future growth and profitability of your company.

At STAC Bizness Solutions, we go beyond just bookkeeping. We will provide your Salon and Spa with customized, decision-ready, financial intelligence reports to help your business become more profitable and reach your goals.

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